HI FRIEND!!!MY NAME IS LAURA I'M FROM COLOMBIA, I HAVE 5 PETS (2 DOGS, 2 CATS AND 1 TORTOISE), I LOVE ANIMALS, CARS, PLANES, MUSIC, SMG, AND A LOT OF OTHER THINGS THAT DOESN'T INCLUDE GOING OUT AND PEOPLE. :D

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from pferdesport with 1,208 notes

29th August 2014

Quote reblogged from My Photo Album. with 1,471 notes

'Pat the horse, kick yourself.'
— Carl Hester (via lbequestrianphotography)

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from blackstirrups with 1,237 notes

charlotte dujardin & valegro x

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from black-tobiano with 988 notes

black-tobiano:

Charlotte Dujardin and Valegro training at home, at Carl Hester’s yard in Newent, Gloucestershire.
(x)

black-tobiano:

Charlotte Dujardin and Valegro training at home, at Carl Hester’s yard in Newent, Gloucestershire.

(x)

29th August 2014

Video reblogged from Riding with 12 notes

blogequestre:

Charlotte Dujardin - World Champion - Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games…

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from best-of-funny with 62,903 notes

the-best-of-funny:

elahthompson:

the goat is not a student…..he’s a teacher.

x

the-best-of-funny:

elahthompson:

the goat is not a student…..he’s a teacher.

x

Source: elahthompson

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Teenagerposts with 1,188 notes

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Cowgirl Barbie with 112 notes

westernuniverse:

countryff4171:

Rainbows n shit makes photos look better

Love

westernuniverse:

countryff4171:

Rainbows n shit makes photos look better

Love

Source: countryff4171

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from My Life As A Small Town Loser with 15 notes

ashleydoesablog:

Pyometria. Distended and pus-filled uterus of a dog.
From:http://tailsofasheltervet.wordpress.com/

ashleydoesablog:

Pyometria. Distended and pus-filled uterus of a dog.

From:
http://tailsofasheltervet.wordpress.com/

Source: tailsofasheltervet.wordpress.com

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from The Absolute Best GIFs with 20,305 notes

Source: primegifs

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Psych2go with 681 notes

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go
Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.
Fact submitted by: bonjourtammy

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

Fact submitted by: bonjourtammy

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from I like the pastel colours with 149 notes

Source: starsdancez

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Thoroughbreds don't cry with 8 notes

racinglegends:

William The Third
Born in 1898, he was bred and owned by William Cavendish-Bentinck the sixth Duke of Portland.
William The Third’s sire was the undefeated champion and one of the most success full sires in history St. Simon, a son of the 1875 Epsom Derby winner and also Leading Sire Galopin. His dam, Gravity, was a daughter of Wisdom.  Gravity’s dam, the influential broodmare Enigma, a direct female ancestor of many major winners including America’s Reigh Count and Candy Spots and Ireland’s Martial. Gravity was also the dam William The Third’s full-sister Gravitation, the great-great-granddam of 1936 American Champion Three-year-old Colt and Horse of the Year Granville.
Like most of the Duke’s horses, William The Great was trained by John Porter at his Kingsclere Stables near Newbury. 
He finished unplaced in the Clearwell Stakes over five furlongs at Nemarket in October 1900, his only race as a two-year-old.
On his first appearance as a three-year-old, in April 1901, he won the Wood Ditton Stakes at Newmarket by six lengths. At Sandown in early May he won the Esher Stakes, again by six lengths. Later in May he won the Newmarket Stakes at Newmarket by a short head over Doricles, who ran second in the 2,000 Guineas to Handicapper in his previous start and would go on to win the St Leger. With that victory, William The Third stamped himself as a Derby contender. He was sent to Epsom to contest in the Derby, in which he started at odds of 100/7 against 24 other three-year-olds. “Ridden by Morny Cannon, he turned into the straight in seventh place and moved up to second approaching the final furlong, but although he “struggled on hard” he was beaten three quarters of a length by Volodyovski, four lengths clear of the remainder.”The two met again in the Lennox Stakes at Hurst in August for a rematch. "With three pounds less than his opponent, the Duke’s colt defeated the Derby winner by a head." William The Third finished the season in the Kempton Park Stakes at Kempton against older horses for the first time, and finished unplaced behind the four-year-old gelding Epsom Lad. 
In 1902, he proved himself as the best stayer in England, as he won his first five races.  On his seasonal debut he ran in the Royal Ascot meeting’s two-and-a-half-mile Ascot Gold Cup, which attracted an extremely strong field, including his old rival Volodyovski, the 1901 Epsom Oaks winner Cap And Bells, the leading British older horses 1902 Coronation Cup winner Osbech and 1901 Ascot Gold Cup winner Santoi, as well as the French challengers 1901 Grand Prix de Paris winner Cheri and 1901 Prix de Diane winner La Camargo. “Ridden by Morny Cannon, William the Third, who started the 2/1 favourite, was held up towards the back of the field of runners until the straight. He then accelerated past his rivals and won easily by five lengths to record a popular victory.”He reappeared the following afternoon for the Queen Alexandra Stakes over two miles and six furlongs. Despite carrying top weight of 136 pounds, he won by six lengths. William The Third returned for the Doncaster Cup in September, after a three-month break, and won by eight lengths at odds of 1/10. No horse appeared to oppose him in the Lowther Stakes (not the Lowther Stakes we know today) at Newmarket in October and he won in a walkover. He then then won the Limekiln Stakes over one and a half miles. On his final start of the season he started odds on favourite for the two-and-a-half-mile Jockey Club Cup, but was surprisingly beaten by Black Sand, the 1902 Cesarewitch Handicap winner.
William the Third remained in training in 1903, as a five-year-old, but sustained a serious pastern injury in training early in the year, and was retired to stud without racing again, and with a record of 14: 10-2-0.
He was retired to become a breeding stallion at his owner’s stud at Welbeck Abbey. He was a successful sire of winners, and finished second in the Sires’ Championship twice. He sired a classic winner in Winkipop, winner of the 1,000 Guineas in 1910, as well as the Coronation Stakes, Nassau Stakes, Yorkshire Oaks and the Sussex Stakes against colts, and later a successful broodmare. 
William The Third suddenly died of a cerebral haemorrhage at Welbeck on 21 February 1917. Five years later he was the Leading Broodmare sire in Great Britain and Ireland.
Photo: W.A. RouchWilliam The Third and Morny Cannon, Ascot Gold Cup 1902

racinglegends:

William The Third

Born in 1898, he was bred and owned by William Cavendish-Bentinck the sixth Duke of Portland.

William The Third’s sire was the undefeated champion and one of the most success full sires in history St. Simon, a son of the 1875 Epsom Derby winner and also Leading Sire Galopin. His dam, Gravity, was a daughter of Wisdom.
Gravity’s dam, the influential broodmare Enigma, a direct female ancestor of many major winners including America’s Reigh Count and Candy Spots and Ireland’s Martial. Gravity was also the dam William The Third’s full-sister Gravitation, the great-great-granddam of 1936 American Champion Three-year-old Colt and Horse of the Year Granville.

Like most of the Duke’s horses, William The Great was trained by John Porter at his Kingsclere Stables near Newbury. 

He finished unplaced in the Clearwell Stakes over five furlongs at Nemarket in October 1900, his only race as a two-year-old.

On his first appearance as a three-year-old, in April 1901, he won the Wood Ditton Stakes at Newmarket by six lengths. At Sandown in early May he won the Esher Stakes, again by six lengths. Later in May he won the Newmarket Stakes at Newmarket by a short head over Doricles, who ran second in the 2,000 Guineas to Handicapper in his previous start and would go on to win the St Leger. With that victory, William The Third stamped himself as a Derby contender.
He was sent to Epsom to contest in the Derby, in which he started at odds of 100/7 against 24 other three-year-olds. “Ridden by Morny Cannon, he turned into the straight in seventh place and moved up to second approaching the final furlong, but although he “struggled on hard” he was beaten three quarters of a length by Volodyovski, four lengths clear of the remainder.”
The two met again in the Lennox Stakes at Hurst in August for a rematch. "With three pounds less than his opponent, the Duke’s colt defeated the Derby winner by a head."
William The Third finished the season in the Kempton Park Stakes at Kempton against older horses for the first time, and finished unplaced behind the four-year-old gelding Epsom Lad.

In 1902, he proved himself as the best stayer in England, as he won his first five races.
On his seasonal debut he ran in the Royal Ascot meeting’s two-and-a-half-mile Ascot Gold Cup, which attracted an extremely strong field, including his old rival Volodyovski, the 1901 Epsom Oaks winner Cap And Bells, the leading British older horses 1902 Coronation Cup winner Osbech and 1901 Ascot Gold Cup winner Santoi, as well as the French challengers 1901 Grand Prix de Paris winner Cheri and 1901 Prix de Diane winner La Camargo“Ridden by Morny Cannon, William the Third, who started the 2/1 favourite, was held up towards the back of the field of runners until the straight. He then accelerated past his rivals and won easily by five lengths to record a popular victory.”
He reappeared the following afternoon for the Queen Alexandra Stakes over two miles and six furlongs. Despite carrying top weight of 136 pounds, he won by six lengths.
William The Third returned for the Doncaster Cup in September, after a three-month break, and won by eight lengths at odds of 1/10. No horse appeared to oppose him in the Lowther Stakes (not the Lowther Stakes we know today) at Newmarket in October and he won in a walkover. He then then won the Limekiln Stakes over one and a half miles.
On his final start of the season he started odds on favourite for the two-and-a-half-mile Jockey Club Cup, but was surprisingly beaten by Black Sand, the 1902 Cesarewitch Handicap winner.

William the Third remained in training in 1903, as a five-year-old, but sustained a serious pastern injury in training early in the year, and was retired to stud without racing again, and with a record of 14: 10-2-0.

He was retired to become a breeding stallion at his owner’s stud at Welbeck Abbey. He was a successful sire of winners, and finished second in the Sires’ Championship twice.
He sired a classic winner in Winkipop, winner of the 1,000 Guineas in 1910, as well as the Coronation Stakes, Nassau Stakes, Yorkshire Oaks and the Sussex Stakes against colts, and later a successful broodmare. 

William The Third suddenly died of a cerebral haemorrhage at Welbeck on 21 February 1917. Five years later he was the Leading Broodmare sire in Great Britain and Ireland.

Photo: W.A. Rouch
William The Third and Morny Cannon, Ascot Gold Cup 1902

29th August 2014

Post reblogged from best-of-funny with 236,169 notes

the-best-of-funny:

beksboys:

"free trial"

image

"all we need is your credit card information"

image

x

Source: beksboys

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Absolute Best GIFs with 7,364 notes

Source: onlylolgifs